New York Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Law

Sec. § 35.03
State Designated Heritage Areas; Boundaries


§ 35.03 State designated heritage areas; boundaries.

1.

The legislature hereby designates the following historic settings of the state that have been identified for their statewide significance in the plan for a statewide system of urban cultural parks prepared pursuant to chapter seven hundred twenty-seven of the laws of nineteen hundred seventy-seven or that have been subsequently identified and which, upon completion of required management plans and their approval by the commissioner, shall be state designated heritage areas:

(a)

The cohesive geographical area within the city of New York, including lower Manhattan or portions thereof and appropriate coastal portions of Brooklyn and Staten Island, associated with and revealing of the development of maritime trade and immigration;

(b)

The cohesive geographical area within the village of Ossining, Westchester county, associated with and revealing of the nineteenth century public health and prison reform activities;

(c)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Kingston, Ulster county, associated with and revealing of the growth and prosperity of a river port shaped by regional modes of transportation;

(d)

The Hudson-Mohawk urban cultural park established by the cities of Troy, Cohoes, Watervliet, the villages of Green Island and Waterford and the towns of Waterford and Colonie and recognized by section 13.27 of this chapter;

(e)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county, associated with and revealing of its development as a nineteenth century health and cultural resort;

(f)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Schenectady associated with both the city’s settlement in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and its growth as a center for electrical and broadcasting development;

(g)

The cohesive geographical area of the village of Whitehall, Washington county, associated with and revealing of its crucial role during the French and Indian Wars, the American Revolution and the War of 1812 and with the development of the American Navy;

(h)

The cohesive geographical area including all or parts of the counties of Broome and Tioga associated with and revealing the natural features and historic development including the topographical and agricultural landscape, Native American settlement, the revolutionary frontier, early industries, labor practices, manufacturing and innovation, immigration and migration;

(i)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Rochester, Monroe county, including the Genesee River Gorge associated with and revealing of the periods of the cities’ growth related to use of the river;

(j)

The cohesive geographical area of the village of Seneca Falls, Seneca county, associated with and revealing of the community’s place in the development of the women’s rights movement;

(k)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Syracuse, Onondaga county, including Hanover and Clinton Squares associated with and revealing of the growth of business and finance;

(l)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Buffalo, Erie county, associated with and revealing of an historic role as a center for entertainment and culture at the frontier; and

(m)

The cohesive geographical area of the village of Sackets Harbor, Jefferson county, associated with and revealing of the community’s role as the headquarters for the defense of the American northern frontier.

(n)

The cohesive geographical area of the city of Albany, Albany county, including the Hudson River waterfront, associated with and revealing an historic role as a geographical crossroads and capital city.

(o)

The cohesive geographical area including all or parts of the counties of Oneida, Herkimer, Montgomery, Fulton, Schenectady, Schoharie, Saratoga and Albany associated with and revealing the natural features and historic development including Native American settlement, the colonial period and industrialization of the region commonly known as the Mohawk Valley region, provided that the area shall not include land within the Adirondack park as defined in section 9-0101 of the environmental conservation law.

(p)

The heritage area within the counties of Nassau and Suffolk encompassed by (i) beginning at the point where state route twenty-five intersects the border between Queens and Nassau counties, then east along said route to the intersection of route four hundred ninety-five, then east along route four hundred ninety-five until said route intersects route twenty-five, then east along route twenty-five to the western border of the town of Southhold, then south from said border to the waters of the Peconic Bay, continuing north along the shoreline to the eastern terminus of Orient Point, then north to the border of the states of New York and Connecticut, then west along said state border to the border between Nassau and Westchester counties, continuing to the southwest to the border between Queens and Nassau counties and then southeast to the point of origin; including therein natural and cultural features associated with and revealing significant early American history including the American Revolution, the development and special character of the historic maritime communities, and the historic mansions and other architecturally significant built structures that distinguish or are characteristic of the north shore of Long Island, (ii) the state route twenty-five-A corridor geographically from Great Neck to Port Jefferson associated generally with significant early American history including, but not limited to, the visit to this area by General George Washington as well as the overall scenic, aesthetic, historic, cultural and physical character of this road and the historic communities and landscapes that it connects, and
(iii)
such historic sites or natural features that may exist outside of the boundaries described in subparagraph (i) of this paragraph, which are appropriate for inclusion by thematic and cultural linkage which are unanimously recommended by the planning commission for such inclusion subject to final approval by the commissioner.

(q)

The cohesive geographical area including all or parts of the counties of Erie, Monroe, Niagara, Orleans and Wayne associated with and revealing the natural features and historic development including Native American settlement, the longest remaining sections of the original alignment of the Erie Canal, Erie Canal lift bridges, and industrialization of the region commonly known as the Western Erie Canal region.

(r)

The Heights heritage area encompassing the cohesive geographic area of west Harlem within the city of New York, including a southerly boundary of one hundred twenty-second street, a northerly boundary of two hundred eighteenth street, an easterly boundary of Highbridge Park and tenth avenue, and a westerly boundary of the appropriate riverside portions along the Hudson river, associated and revealing the historic development of maritime history, military war history, and the northern Manhattan migration.

(s)

The cohesive geographical area including all or parts of the county of Chautauqua associated with and revealing grape growing, processing and the unique local grape culture, including stewardship and development of the wine and juice industries, of the region commonly known as the Lake Erie concord grape belt region.

(t)

The Michigan Street African American heritage corridor encompassing the geographical corridor of the east side of downtown Buffalo, Erie county, located between Broadway, Eagle, Elm and Nash to William street, William street (east) to Pine street, and Pine street (south) to Eagle, which includes the J. Edward Nash House, the Michigan Street Baptist Church, and the Colored Musicians Club, associated with and revealing of an historic role as the center of African American history, culture, and reform activities, and such other historic sites that may exist outside the boundaries described herein which are appropriate for inclusion by thematic and cultural linkage which are recommended by the commission subject to final approval by the commissioner.

(u)

The cohesive geographic area of the city of Niagara Falls, Niagara County, associated with and revealing of the community’s place in the development of the underground railroad and abolitionist movements and other reform activities.

2.

The boundaries for each state designated heritage area shall be the boundaries depicted on the map accompanying each such management plan upon its approval by the commissioner. The commissioner, with the approval of the local legislative body of a city, town or village where the property to be added or removed is located, may amend or revise state designated heritage area boundaries after their initial approval after publication of a revised drawing or other boundary description in the state register. Boundary maps for each state designated heritage area shall be kept on file at the office of parks, recreation and historic preservation and at the office of the county clerk where the state designated heritage area is located.

3.

Any area designated to be a state designated heritage area under subdivision one of this section, that has not had a management plan approved by the commissioner within four years of designation pursuant to this section shall be considered as no longer so designated. In each case where such a four year period expires, the commissioner shall notify the governor and the legislature in writing of the reasons why a management plan was not approved.

4.

The commissioner, in cooperation with the advisory council, may on an ongoing basis, evaluate areas of the state as potential heritage areas with regard to their statewide significance and the policies of this title. The commissioner may establish guidelines for evaluating eligibility including the statewide significance of the resource and the local capability to participate in a state-local partnership for management of a state designated heritage area. Recommendations of areas identified as eligible for state designation shall be submitted by the commissioner to the legislature with the commissioner’s evaluation of such areas.
Source

Last accessed
Dec. 13, 2016