N.Y. Legislative Law Section 41
Evidence of when bill becomes a law


If a bill becomes a law by the approval of the governor, the certificate of the governor shall be the evidence of the time when the bill becomes a law. If appropriations for the legislature or judiciary or separate items added to a bill by the legislature pursuant to article seven of the constitution become part of law previously enacted by the passage of the bill therefor by both houses of the legislature as provided in such article of the constitution, the certificate of the governor shall be evidence of the time when such appropriations and added items become part of such law. If a bill becomes a law by the failure of the governor to sign it or to return it to the house where it originated without his approval within the time required by the constitution, or if, under article seven of the constitution, a bill containing two or more appropriations becomes a law immediately as to all or as to part of the bill, upon the passage thereof by both houses of the legislature and without further action by the governor, the certificate of the secretary of state of the time when the bill was filed in his office shall be evidence of the time when the bill, or the part thereof not requiring further action by the governor, became a law.

Source: Section 41 — Evidence of when bill becomes a law, https://www.­nysenate.­gov/legislation/laws/LEG/41 (updated Sep. 22, 2014; accessed Jun. 15, 2024).

Accessed:
Jun. 15, 2024

Last modified:
Sep. 22, 2014

§ 41’s source at nysenate​.gov

Link Style